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BBC News - Science/Nature - UK Edition 

Memories 'flipped' from bad to good

Neuroscientists artificially turn a mouse's fearful memory into a positive one, and vice versa.

UK Ebola vaccine trial to start

A trial vaccine against Ebola could be tested on healthy volunteers in the UK in September, says an international health consortium.

Concerns grow over Iceland volcano

Overnight earthquakes raise fears that magma from Iceland's Bardarbunga volcano could be heading towards another large volcanic system, scientists say.

A sheepdog's 'two rules' for success

Scientists produce a simple mathematical model that explains how a single sheepdog can herd a large number of sheep.

Global coal 'binge' missed in data

The climate impacts of the world's fossil-fuelled power plants are being underestimated because of poor accounting, say researchers.

Badger cull targets are announced

A target number of badgers to be killed in this year's pilot cull to tackle tuberculosis in cattle is announced.

World's rarest bird needs new home

The last remaining population of the world's rarest bird, the Madagascar pochard, needs a new wetland home if it is to thrive again, a study reveals.

Magnetic levitation in 3D advances

Harvard researchers develop a system to orientate small objects in any direction using magnetic levitation.

Potential comet landing sites chosen

Europe's Rosetta mission, which aims to put a robot on a comet in November, has identified five potential sites for the touchdown.

Methane vents bubble up off US coast

Researchers say they have discovered more than 500 bubbling methane vents on the seafloor off the US east coast.

Whole organ 'grown' in world first

A whole functional organ has been grown from scratch inside an animal for the first time, say researchers in Scotland.

Galileo satellites on wrong orbit

The European Space Agency says the latest two satellites for Europe's version of the US GPS sat-nav system have not gone into the correct orbit.

MH370 search faces tough next phase

The next part of the hunt for the missing Malaysia Airlines jet MH370 will be very challenging in places, sea-floor mapping data suggests.

Warming 'pause' may last until 2025

The hiatus in the rise in global temperatures is being caused by the Atlantic Ocean and could last another 10 years, say researchers.

Stench of decay turns coral away

Baby coral and fish can smell the difference between good and bad reefs, say marine ecologists.

Hints of elusive early stars found

Astronomers may have discovered the chemical signature of one of the Universe's earliest stars.

Star Trek X Prize finalists named

Ten groups have been chosen as finalists in a $10m (£6m) competition to develop a real-life "tricorder" - the medical scanner used in Star Trek.

Lockheed Martin in space junk deal

US defence giant Lockheed Martin is teaming up with an Australian technology firm to track space debris that can damage multi-billion dollar satellites.

Rosetta's 10-billion-tonne comet

Scientists determine the comet being followed by Europe's Rosetta spacecraft to have a mass of 10 billion tonnes.

Curiosity drill test cut short

Nasa's Curiosity rover looks to examine another sample of Martian rock, but its drill test in a slab dubbed "Bonanza King" fails to complete properly.

Darwin's barnacles found in Denmark

A gift from the world-famous naturalist is to go on display in Copenhagen.

Four white lion cubs born in Germany

Four rare white lion cubs - three males and one female - are born at a circus on tour in eastern Germany.

Earliest evidence of snail-eating

Palaeolithic humans in Spain began eating snails 10,000 years earlier than their Mediterranean neighbours, a study reveals.

Tree-hugging snakes put safety first

For the first time, biologists measure the force applied by climbing snakes and find that they squeeze up to five times harder than necessary.

Seals 'brought TB to the Americas'

Marine mammals brought tuberculosis to the Americas before the Europeans arrived, a study suggests.

Urban areas are hives for wild bees

A study finds a "considerable richness" of bee species in urban habitats, suggesting cities could help maintain healthy populations of the vital pollinators.

Greenland ice sheet losses double

A new assessment from Europe's CryoSat spacecraft shows Greenland to be losing about 375 cu km of ice each year.

'Growth drives UK flooding problems'

Part of the UK's problem with flooding is self-imposed, according to new research.

Iceland raises volcano alert level

The risk of an eruption at Iceland's Bardarbunga volcano has increased, as well as the risk level to the aviation industry, meteorologists say.

Magpies 'don't steal shiny objects'

Science dispels the popular myth that magpies like to steal shiny objects for their nests.


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