Crawler portal provides unique Web metasearch, adjustable web content, FREE 5GB webmail, Yellow Pages, Ringtones, Games, Screensavers, Wallpapers, more!
News Photos Games Screensavers Help

You are not signed in. Sign In • Sign Up

 

ScienceDaily: Dog News 

Social network research may boost prairie dog conservation efforts

Using statistical tools to map social connections in prairie dogs, researchers have uncovered relationships that escaped traditional observational techniques, shedding light on prairie dog communities that may help limit the spread of bubonic plague and guide future conservation efforts.

Humans share fairness concerns with other species

Humans aren’t the only species to react strongly to actions they consider unfair. A similar drive for fairness in monkeys and some dogs may offer insight into people’s desire for equity, according to experts.

Rising temperatures can be hard on a dog's life

Veterinarians say it is important to know the signs of heat exhaustion to make sure your pet isn't overdoing it this summer.

Dog jealousy: Study suggests primordial origins for the 'green-eyed monster'

Dogs exhibit jealous behaviors. The first experimental test of jealousy in dogs supports the view that there may be a more basic form of jealousy, which evolved to protect social bonds from interlopers.

African elephant genome suggests they are superior smellers

Sense of smell is critical for survival in many mammals. In a new study, researchers examined the olfactory receptor repertoire encoded in 13 mammalian species and found that African elephants have the largest number of OR genes ever characterized; more than twice that found in dogs, and five times more than in humans.

Asian genes in European pigs result in more piglets

Pigs that are bred commercially in Europe are found to have a highly varied mosaic of different European and Asian gene variants. The Asian genes in particular result in a large number of piglets in European pig breeds. Researchers now explain that a number of important characteristics of European pigs have Asian origins. They previously demonstrated that the genetic diversity among commercial pig

Dog food goes gourmet: Nine emerging trends in pet food

Four out of five pet owners now consider their pet a member of the family, and consumers are shifting their priorities when it comes to purchasing food for their pets accordingly. One expert writes about recent trends in gourmet pet food in a newly published article.

Politically driven legislation targeting dangerous dogs has had little impact

UK legislation that targets 'dangerous dogs' has not been shown to reduce dog bites and policies should be based on evidence and risk assessment, suggests a new article. Risk assessment for human violence has proved to be accurate and reliable and the author says this "might be a practical preventative measure to reduce injury from dog bite" along with medical and veterinary professionals "familia

Domestication syndrome: White patches, baby faces and tameness explained by mild neural crest deficits

More than 140 years ago, Charles Darwin noticed something peculiar about domesticated mammals. Compared to their wild ancestors, domestic species are more tame, and they also tend to display a suite of other characteristic features, including floppier ears, patches of white fur, and more juvenile faces with smaller jaws. Since Darwin’s observations, the explanation for this pattern has proved elus

Making a more healthful, low-fat hot dog without giving up texture

Low-fat wieners made with olive oil rather than pork fat make progress toward a healthful alternative hot dog without sacrificing satisfying flavor and texture.

Wolf mother deaths threaten pack survival but not population

When a breeding wolf dies, its sex and the size of its pack can determine whether that pack continues, according to research. In 2012, biologists at Denali National Park and Preserve noted a drop in wolf sightings following the death of a breeding female from a pack that lived along the Denali Park Road.

First cancer immunotherapy for dogs developed

Nearly every second dog develops cancer from the age of ten years onward. A few therapies derived from human medicine are available for dogs. A very successful form of therapy by which antibodies inhibit tumor growth has not been available for animals so far. Scientists have developed, for the first time, antibodies to treat cancer in dogs.

Forelimb bone data predicts predator style

In their quest to understand what kind of hunter the extinct marsupial Thylacine was, two paleobiologists built a dataset of forelimb bone measurements that predict the predation style of a wide variety of carnivorous mammals.

Some dogs and cats prone to sunburn: How to protect your animal from skin damage

Excessive sunbathing damages the skin. Humans are not the only ones who need to monitor their exposure to UV rays: animals are at risk too. Dogs and cats with white or thin coats are at particular risk, as are animals with very closely shorn fur or with certain pre-existing conditions.

Some dogs could see a kennel stay as exciting

New research suggests that dogs who spend a short time in boarding kennels may not find it unduly stressful and could in fact find the change of scenery exciting.

The truth behind the '5-second rule': When in doubt, throw it out, expert says

The burger patty that slides off the plate, the ice cream treat that plops on the picnic table, the hot dog that rolls off the grill -- conventional wisdom has it that you have five seconds to pick it up before it is contaminated. Fact or folklore? “A dropped item is immediately contaminated and can’t really be sanitized,” explains one researcher. “When it comes to folklore, the ‘five-second rule’

Nonsurgical treatment for enlarged prostate on the horizon

A study published in The Prostate offers hope to men suffering from benign prostatic hyperplasia. Scientists treated 20 affected dogs with pulsed electromagnetic field therapy for 5 minutes, twice a day, for three weeks. This noninvasive technique resulted in an average 57 percent decrease in the size of the prostate gland. The researchers also found no side effects or impact on libido, semen qual

Picking the right virus candidate for gene therapy

Viruses often get bad press. Likened to Trojan horses they are often associated with disease. But, it is precisely because of their infectious nature that they can potentially be used as gene vectors - which are vehicles loaded with good copies of malfunctioning genes - and delivered to cells. This is difficult but even more so is penetrating the fortress of the brain. But this is exactly what gen

Saving Africa's wild dogs -- with urine

The endangered African wild dog is increasingly coming into conflict with humans, partly because it is difficult to fence them out. But research shows that an unusual approach to keeping them away from people and livestock may offer hope. Promising experiments show that scent marking is more effective as a barrier than fences.

Evolution of equine influenza led to canine offshoot which could mix with human influenza

Equine influenza viruses from the early 2000s can easily infect the respiratory tracts of dogs, while those from the 1960s are only barely able to, according to research. The research also suggests that canine and human influenza viruses can mix, and generate new influenza viruses.

What amino acids in shells can tell us about Bronze Age people

A new study has shed new light on the use of mollusc shells as personal adornments by Bronze Age people. The research team used amino acid racemisation analysis (a technique used previously mainly for dating artefacts), light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, to identify the raw materials used to make beads in a complex necklace discovered at an Early Bronze Age buri

Animal trapping records reveal strong wolf effect across North America

Coyote and red fox fur trapping records across North America have been used by scientists to document how the presence of wolves influences the balance of smaller predators further down the food chain. From Alaska and Yukon to Nova Scotia and Maine, the researchers have demonstrated that a "wolf effect" exists, favoring red foxes where wolves are present and coyotes where wolves are absent.

Wolves in wolves' clothing not all the same: Surprising distinction between mainland, coastal wolves in B.C.

British Columbia's mainland wolves and coastal wolves are more distinct than previously believed, research shows. The discovery emphasizes the importance of incorporating traditional ecological perspectives with empirical scientific methods, and the authors attribute the observed genetic differentiation to the profoundly different ecological environments.

Man's best friend: What does 'Fido's' behavior say about the relationship between you and your dog?

For centuries, dogs have been described as man’s best friend. This bond may be linked to your dog's behavior, according to a new study by a professor of animal behavior, ecology and conservation. The study revealed that the more dogs demonstrate attention-seeking behavior with their adult owners, the more attached these owners are likely to be with their dogs. Interestingly, however, this made no

Research could lead to new cancer assay, aid both dogs and humans

Veterinary researchers have identified a unique group of proteins that indicate the presence of transitional cell carcinoma -- the most common cause of bladder cancer -- and may lead to a new assay which could better diagnose this disease in both dogs and humans. Bladder cancer is particularly common in some dog breeds, such as collies, sheepdogs and terriers, but is rarely diagnosed in animals be

Are your pets disturbing your sleep? You’re not alone

While countless pet owners peacefully sleep with a warm pet nearby, a new study finds an increase in the number of people experiencing sleep disturbances because of their pets.

Domestication of dogs may explain mammoth kill sites and success of early modern humans

A new analysis of European archaeological sites containing large numbers of dead mammoths and dwellings built with mammoth bones has led to a new interpretation of these sites -- that their abrupt appearance may have been due to early modern humans working with the earliest domesticated dogs to kill the now-extinct mammoth.

Secret cargo of mosquitoes: Dirofilaria repens detected for time in Austria

Until a short while ago, infections with the parasite Dirofilaria repens was regarded as a classical traveler's disease. Mosquitoes from abroad passed the parasite on to dogs, in some cases even to humans. The most recent research data have shown, for the first time that the parasite has been imported to Austria and established here. In mosquitoes from the state of Burgenland, the scientists found

Cell migration and the mysterious role of cadherin

Fruit-fly ovaries were used in a new study to uncover how E-cadherin guides collective cell migration. According to traditional scientific dogma, E-cadherin acts like the mortar between bricks, holding cells together and preventing motility. This research team found the opposite: Cadherin is actually promoting the ability of cells to move and migrate. "It's doing it in three different ways in thre

Osteosarcoma immunotherapy study has potential to benefit both dogs, humans

Osteosarcoma is a highly aggressive bone tumor that affects at least 10,000 dogs annually in the United States. It is most commonly seen in the adult large and giant breeds such as Rottweilers, Labrador retrievers, greyhounds, Newfoundlands, Irish wolfhounds, Great Danes and Scottish deerhounds. “Since dogs with osteosarcoma represent spontaneous bona-fide model of the same disease in children, it


Crawler, LLC News | Awards & Certificates | Promote Us | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Uninstall Info

© 2014 Crawler, LLC. All rights reserved. Crawler, LLC is part of the Xacti Group Companies.
All other names are trademarks and/or registered trademarks of their respective owners.