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ScienceDaily: Dog News 

Down to three wolves on Isle Royale

Only three wolves seem to remain in Isle Royale National Park. Researchers observed the wolves during their annual Winter Study, and the lone group, at an unprecedented low, is a sharp decline from nine wolves observed last winter.

Ways to avoid catching diseases from pets

Pets can pass diseases to humans, especially when a pet owner's immune system is compromised. Here, veterinarians outline ways for families to avoid disease transmission by choosing the right type of pet--or making small changes in the ways they enjoy the pets they already have.

Gene signatures predict doxorubicin response in kK9 osteosarcoma

A gene expression model that predicts canine osteosarcoma response to doxorubicin has been identified by researchers, potentially allowing veterinary oncologists to better choose which drug to use with their patients.

160 people die of rabies every day, says major new study

A global study on canine rabies has found that 160 people die every single day from the disease. The report is the first study to consider the impact in terms of deaths and the economic costs of rabies across all countries. Even though the disease is preventable, 59,000 people die every year of rabies transmitted by dogs, and the disease costs global economies $8.6 billion US.

Novel neurodegenerative disease and gene identified with the help of 'man's best friend'

A breakthrough study performed with veterinary neurologists and neuropathologists has identified a gene mutation that causes a novel type of neurodegenerative disease in dogs. The results of the study shed light into the function of neurons, provide a new gene for human neurodegenration, and may aid in developing better treatments for neurodegenerative disorders.

Canine influenza: Veterinarian explains what every dog owner should know about disease

A veterinarian explains what pet owners need to know about canine influenza and how they can protect their pet.

Can humans get norovirus from their dogs?

Human norovirus may infect our canine companions, according to research. That raises the possibility of dog-to-human transmission, says a veterinarian and first author of a new report.

Animals can adapt to increasingly frequent cold snaps

There is substantial genetic variation in nature for both long-term seasonal acclimation and short-term acclimation associated with rapid extreme weather events, a new study shows. While much of the emphasis regarding climate change is on overall warming, increased frequency of extreme weather events is also a critical concern. As fall and spring temperatures rise, animals will increasingly have t

Why people let their dogs defecate in public, and don't clean up after them

Generally, Western societies maintain high standards of everyday hygiene. When it comes to 'man's best friend,' however, it seems we turn a blind eye! New research explores the reasons behind this relaxed attitude to canine excrement and the strategies employed by dog-owners to deal with it.

Sniffing safer: New canine training aid matches explosives' scent but doesn't explode

One of the biggest challenges in the training and testing of canine teams results from the explosives materials themselves - especially new homemade explosives. A new training aid has been created that matches the scent of explosive materials but poses no danger to the trainers, the canines or the environment.

Old cancer drug could have new use in fighting cancer

An old cancer drug can not only kill cancer cells, but also works to change how certain cancer cells function, weakening those cells so they can be killed by other drugs, a veterinary researcher has discovered.

Move over Mozart: Study shows cats prefer their own beat

As more animal shelters, primate centers and zoos start to play music for their charges, it's still not clear whether and how human music affects animals. Now, a study shows that while cats ignore our music, they are highly responsive to "music" written especially for them.

Scent-trained dog detects thyroid cancer in human urine samples

A trained scent dog accurately identified whether patients' urine samples had thyroid cancer or were benign (noncancerous) 88.2 percent of the time, according to a new study.

Dog DNA tests alone not enough for healthy pedigree, experts say

Breeding dogs on the basis of a single genetic test carries risks and may not improve the health of pedigree lines, experts warn. Only a combined approach that makes use of DNA analysis, health screening schemes and pedigree information will significantly reduce the frequency of inherited diseases, according to a review of the practice.

Infection control experts outline guidance for animal visitations in hospitals

New expert guidance outlines recommendations for developing policies regarding the use of animals in healthcare facilities, including animal-assisted activities, service animals, research animals and personal pet visitation in acute care hospitals.

Distemper virus affects wild carnivores of all stripes

Tigers, lions and other wild carnivores, already under threat from poaching and habitat loss, are falling victim to Canine distemper, and could soon drive endangered populations to extinction.

The eyes have it: Cats put sight over smell in finding food

Cats may prefer to use their eyes rather than follow their nose when it comes to finding the location of food, according to new research by leading animal behaviorists.

Possible biological trigger for canine bone cancer found

The biological mechanism that may give some cancer cells the ability to form tumors in dogs has been identified by researchers. The recent study uncovered an association between the increased expression of a particular gene in tumor cells and more aggressive behavior in a form of canine bone cancer. It may also have implications for human cancers by detailing a new pathway for tumor formation.

Wildlife at risk around the globe: Scientists say vaccinating endangered carnivores of increasing importance

Experts from around the world focused on the threat that canine distemper virus poses to the conservation of increasingly fragmented populations of threatened carnivores. While canine distemper has been known for many years as a problem affecting domestic dogs, the virus has been appearing in new areas and causing disease and mortality in a wide range of wildlife species, including tigers and lion

Dogs know that smile on your face

Dogs can tell the difference between happy and angry human faces, according to a new study. The discovery represents the first solid evidence that an animal other than humans can discriminate between emotional expressions in another species, the researchers say.

The first kobuviruses described from Africa

Scientists have genetically describe the first kobuviruses to be reported from Africa. The results show that the viruses are less host-specific than previously assumed.

Pigeon power: Study suggests similarity between how pigeons learn the equivalent of words and the way children do

A new study finds pigeons can categorize 128 photographs into 16 categories of natural and humanmade objects, a skill researchers say is similar to the mechanism children use to learn words.

Dog disease in lions spread by multiple species

Canine distemper, a viral disease that's been infecting the famed lions of Tanzania's Serengeti National Park, appears to be spread by multiple animal species, according to a study published by a transcontinental team of scientists.

Rabies booster defends pets with out-of-date vaccination against the disease

Pets with out-of-date rabies vaccinations are very unlikely to develop the fatal disease if given a rabies booster immediately after exposure to the virus, a new study by veterinary diagnosticians finds.

Dog-human cooperation is based on social skills of wolves, scientists show

Dogs are 'man's best friend.' The origins of this dog-human relationship were subject of a study by behavioral scientists. They showed that the ancestors of dogs, the wolves, are at least as attentive to members of their species and to humans as dogs are. This social skill did not emerge during domestication, as has been suggested previously, but was already present in wolves.

Helicopter parenting better for pets than for kids

Helicopter parenting may not be the best strategy for raising independent kids. But a healthy measure of overprotectiveness could actually be advantageous when raising dogs and cats, according to a new study that compares 'dog people' to 'cat people' and correlates neuroticism with better pet care.

Clinical trial shows benefits of animal-assisted therapy in adult cancer patients undergoing complex cancer treatment with chemotherapy, radiation therapy

Therapy dogs may improve the emotional well-being of some cancer patients, according to results of a clinical study, the first to document the benefits of animal-assisted therapy in adult cancer patients. "Thanks to this rigorously designed study, we now have strong evidence that pet therapy is an effective tool to help cancer patients get through challenging treatments," said one researcher.

Study of ancient dogs in the Americas yields insights into human, dog migration

A new study suggests that dogs may have first successfully migrated to the Americas only about 10,000 years ago, thousands of years after the first human migrants crossed a land bridge from Siberia to North America.

Ouch! When teeth and hands connect, bites may be beastly

Hand injuries are frequently caused by human and animal bites, prompting as many as 330,000 emergency department visits in the United States each year. A literature review outlines the potential complications of human and animal bites to the hand, the importance of early injury assessment, and the use of antibiotic and other treatment methods to avoid infection, permanent disability, and amputatio

Discovery of mutated gene in dogs could help treat blindness

A MERTK gene defect responsible for a recently identified form of progressive retinal atrophy in Swedish vallhund dogs has been found by an international team of scientists. This discovery opens the door to the development of therapies for diseases that cause blindness both in dogs and humans.


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