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The Guardian (U.K.) 

New stem cell operation could revolutionise treatment of knee injuries

Operation being trialled at Southampton hospital involves coating damaged cartilage with stem cells from patient's hip Continue reading...

Pandas search high and low to get their fill of different bamboos

Chinese and Australian scientists find pandas migrate long distances to maintain a balanced diet which helps them breed Continue reading...

There's life out there: the artist shooting bonsai trees into space

Azuma Makoto's astonishing extraterrestrial plants are a totally new type of landscape, set against the infinity of space Continue reading...

Procedure to create babies with three people's DNA could be legalised in April

Government to press ahead with regulations on mitochondrial transfer after public consultation, but several hurdles remain Continue reading...

Safety concerns remain over three-person IVF

Using mitochondrial replacement therapy to create embryos with DNA from three people could have serious consequences Continue reading...

The politics of science in social media

Oliver Marsh reports on the first Guardian Political Science event Continue reading...

Great moments in science (if Twitter had existed)

Twitter is the source of a great deal of modern news, and scientists are often encouraged to tweet about their research. So what if Twitter had been around during the times of historic scientific breakthroughs and discoveries? Continue reading...

Flashy facilities arent enough to keep UK science healthy

The UK must invest in the triple-helix capacity of its universities: world-leading research, world-class education and training, and strong links with business and local economies, writes the Royal Society of Chemistry's Richard Walker Continue reading...

Was this the last wild wolf of Britain?

Adam Weymouth picks up the trail of the wolf folklore suggests was the last to roam wildly in Great Britain before being shot in the Scottish Highlands in 1680 Continue reading...

Detecting dementia: the first steps towards dignity

While we are a long way off a cure for dementia, new techniques might help us in the drive to identify it earlier, explains Tania Browne Continue reading...

From Roots to Riches: the power of plants - podcast

The first director of science at Kew Gardens, Kathy Willis, discusses her BBC Radio 4 series From Roots to Riches Continue reading...

The meaning of exponential

Why populations explode, and why traces of radioactive elements can hang around for a very long time Continue reading...

New to Nature No 127: Frankenia fruticosa

The emergence of a previously undocumented dwarf shrub in an area of South Africa points to an adaptation success story Continue reading...

Close encounter with Comet 67P may reveal origins of life on Earth

European probe Rosetta will close in on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko next month and its analysis could reveal whether comets brought Earth its water and amino acids Continue reading...

Vanishing point: five ways to become invisible

From HG Wells to JK Rowling, invisibility has long been the stuff of fiction. Not any more. Here Philip Ball explains five methods that scientists are researching to make things 'disappear' Continue reading...

DNA mates: how genetic factors may play a subtle part in our friendships

Humans share biological markers with friends much as we do with extended family members, says a scientific study Continue reading...

From anthrax to bird flu the dangers of lax security in disease-control labs

A series of security failures in US disease-control labs handling lethal bugs such as anthrax, smallpox and bird flu has raised questions about the dangers of research into deadly pathogens Continue reading...

Exosuit aims to open up hidden undersea world to researchers

Scientists test 'superhero-style' suit that will enable underwater exploration and biological study at depths of up to 1,000ft Continue reading...

Tom Elsdale obituary

Continue reading...

Matthew Flinders bicentenary: statue unveiled to the most famous navigator youve probably never heard of

Its a story that has it all: skill, heroic endeavour, capture by the French and a cat. Familiar to Australians, a new statue to Matthew Flinders at Euston aims to bring his reputation home Continue reading...

Meteorites, monkeys and mental health - blogs roundup

Posts on our network this week included a report on a new study into pornography addiction, the healing powers of flatulence, and a look at what particle physics and medical screening have in common Continue reading...

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes: how scientifically plausible is it?

The latest Planet of the Apes movie is in UK cinemas from Thursday. Six experts in primate evolution, anatomy, behaviour and communication deliver their verdicts on the film_Scroll down to watch Carole Jahme interview Andy Serkis, who plays the chimp Caesar_ Continue reading...

How to handle the heat (with science)

Many are reporting that this weekend could see a heatwave in the UK. But wherever and whenever they are, intelligent humans have developed ways to cool down, some of which are more drastic than others Continue reading...

Films that help parents bring science home to their children

Many home science demonstrations fail to convey crucial aspects of the subject. The Royal Institution's ExpeRimental films aim to change that Continue reading...

Nasa's Curiosity rover finds large iron meteorite on Mars

The iron meteorite discovered by the Curiosity rover must once have been at the heart of a growing planet that was shattered aeons ago Continue reading...

It could save my children, but I don't want to know

What do particle physics and medical screening have in common? And why might we want to be tested, but not hear the result? Continue reading...

Smoking and mental health, what's the connection?

People with mental health problems who smoke cost the UK economy £2.34bn, according to new research. But why is smoking so prevalent in this group? Continue reading...

Silent, not deadly; how farts cure diseases

A recent study from the University of Exeter has been reported as showing that smelling farts can cure cancer, as well as many other diseases. Although the study itself doesnt actually say this at any point, if farts do have healing powers it would have numerous wide-reaching implications Continue reading...

Is compulsive sexual behaviour comparable to drug addiction?

A new brain imaging study offers a thoughtful take on the touchy subject of pornography addiction Continue reading...

Bacon, bombs and bosons - blogs roundup

Posts on our network this week included insights into the science of laughter, how the triceratops' horns evolved, and why destroying the last samples of smallpox might be a bad thing Continue reading...


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