Crawler portal provides unique Web metasearch, adjustable web content, FREE 5GB webmail, Yellow Pages, Ringtones, Games, Screensavers, Wallpapers, more!
News Photos Games Screensavers Help

You are not signed in. Sign In • Sign Up

 

The Guardian (U.K.) 

Making gravity-free espresso in space really is rocket science

Specially designed ‘ISSpresso’ machine overcomes absence of gravity by firing pressurised water through capsule of coffeePerhaps one of the last barriers to the human conquest of space has been removed; a space-rated espresso machine has now been delivered to the International Space Station (ISS).The device was made by two Turin-based companies, Lavazza Coffee and engineering firm Argotec.

Alexander Grothendieck obituary

He sought out the connections between whole areas of mathematicsAlexander Grothendieck, who has died aged 86, was the leading figure in reshaping the contours of mathematics in the second half of the 20th century. Born in Germany but brought up in France, he established his international reputation with a paper published in Japan in the Tohoku Mathematical Journal (1957). It came to be known ju

Scientists reveal the 12 'megashocks' that threaten Australia's biosecurity

CSIRO says megashocks including terrorist attacks and pandemics could hit Australia in the next few decades A bioterrorist attack or swine flu-like pandemic.Incursion of a new wheat disease or fruit fly crippling crops. Continue reading...

The role of genes in our sexual orientation - podcast

What do the latest studies into sexual orientation reveal? Plus, can we win the fight against Ebola in West Africa, and what threat does the virus really pose to people in Europe and the US? Continue reading...

Face blindness – when you can’t recognise a familiar face

In a winning essay for the Wellcome Trust science writing prize, Kate Szell reports on research into prosopagnosia – face blindnessLast month, Kate Szell was judged the winner of the Wellcome Trust’s science writing prize in category B for “anyone with a non-professional interest, including undergraduates”. More than 640 articles were submitted in total, with the top 20 judged by a panel cons

Opening minds: the biotech company aiming to change stroke victims’ lives

Olav Hellebø and his firm Reneuron have developed a procedure to help patients by injecting stem cells into their brainsHe wants to bore a hole in your head. But don’t panic, Olav Hellebø is not a modern-day trepanist and it will be a top-notch surgeon, not the 49-year-old Norwegian businessman, holding the drill.Drilling holes in the skull sounds drastic. But Hellebø says it is worth it; th

Alan Turing was one of many heroes at Bletchley Park

Your two correspondents (Engineers, linguists and other heroes, Letters, 22 November) rightly appeal for more praise for others at Bletchley Park during the war. Alan Turing was certainly not the only golden pebble on the Bletchley beach. More than a third of my book Bletchley Park: An Inmate’s Story was composed of nearly 50 short biographies of most of those whose work led to cryptographic suc

Man’s headaches due to tapeworm living in his brain for four years

Parasitic worm normally found in amphibians and crustaceans in China may have scavenged nutrients from patient’s brainA man who went to see his doctor after suffering headaches and experiencing strange smells was found to have been living for more than four years with a rare parasitic worm in his brain.In the first case of its kind in Britain, the ribbon-shaped tapeworm was found to have b

Brain damage could be repaired by creating new nerve cells

Researchers have regenerated damaged areas in the brains of mice by converting structural cells into functioning neuronsScientists have raised hopes that brain damage caused by strokes, stab wounds and even bullets could one day be repaired by converting structural cells into functioning neurons.For the first time, they have managed to regenerate damaged areas of the cerebral cortex of liv

Candy Warhol: why Smartie art is M&Mazing - in pictures

Decorating a cake and in need of inspiration? A new website enables you to turn any image into a mosaic of confectionary. You don’t need as many choco-pixels as you might think in order to create a convincing image. Continue reading...

Climate change is an obvious myth – how much more evidence do you need?

Many people just refuse to accept the facts that surround them, even if we saw 100 more years of it plain and apparent Continue reading...

Palliative care can provide a better death – and even a longer life

Despite death being our only shared destiny, there is an amazing amount of misinformation about what medicine can achieve at the end of life Continue reading...

Are links between breastfeeding and health confounded? Quite possibly

How robust is observational data assessing associations between breastfeeding and health? A 2008 study came up with a novel way to try and find out Continue reading...

Ebola is scary, but antibiotic resistance should scare us more

Irresponsible media coverage stokes fears out of all proportion to the actual risks, while major health threats are considered insufficiently newsworthy Continue reading...

Sizing up a new particle accelerator, and the 'cosmic stupid' limit

Even if you assume you have the technology and the money to do it, how big should any successor to CERN’s Large Hadron Collider be? Physicists are trying to work it out Continue reading...

Behind the scenes of a 'shocking' new study on human altruism

A recent study suggests most people would rather harm themselves than a stranger for profit. Lead author Molly Crockett takes us behind the scenes of the research Continue reading...

Shelf Life: 33 Million Things

Natural history museums are many things, but they are not peopled exclusively with dry, dusty old white men, rooting around in dry, dusty old drawers, examining dry, dusty old dead things. Continue reading...

New books Party: Books that arrived recently

Today I share my first impressions of books about urban birds, materials science and a children’s dystopian novel that was recently adapted into a film. Continue reading...

Smoking, squirrels and Saatchi - blogs roundup

Posts on our network this week included a new study on Australian attitudes towards plain packaging, the announcement that a major brain pathway has been rediscovered, and a look at the effectiveness of motivational posters Continue reading...

Does Miss America really promote gender equality in science?

Despite good intentions and a strong dedication to the promotion of science and technology, pageant winners chosen largely by their attractiveness in swimsuits perpetuate gender inequality and serve as poor role models Continue reading...

Banking turns people into rotten cheats

A new study suggests that while bankers are no more flawed as human beings than the rest of us, the culture of the financial sector needs to change Continue reading...

World Toilet Day. Yuck!

The psychology of disgust helps explain why there is resistance to talking about toilets and how to get around it. Continue reading...

Motivational posters: do they actually work?

Motivational and inspirational quotes and images seem to saturate every facet of our daily lives. Given how widespread they’ve become, it would be fair to assume they actually work. However, the science behind it suggests otherwise Continue reading...

How to nip antisocial personality disorder in the bud

A study suggests that an intensive programme of intervention starting at six reduces long-term risk of mental illness and drug or violence-related convictions Continue reading...

Attacking critics is no way to fix the Saatchi bill

The Medical Innovation bill, also known as the Saatchi bill, has drawn strong criticism from across the medical and legal professions, from patient groups and charities. Instead of acting on that criticism, Lord Saatchi has gone on the offensive Continue reading...

Major brain pathway rediscovered

A massive white matter tract at the back of the brain, overlooked for the past century, might be crucial for skills such as reading. Continue reading...

Eye Benders wins Royal Society Young People’s Book Prize

Eye Benders, a children’s book by Clive Gifford & Professor Anil Seth, is filled with optical illusions. The authors explain the science behind how these illusions work and demonstrate the many different ways that they trick your brain. Continue reading...

History of science books: Pickstone Prize shortlist announced

The British Society for the History of Science has announced the shortlist for its new prize for the best scholarly book in the field Continue reading...

Study finds cigarette smokers in Australia now support plain packaging

Despite Australian smokers being against it before implementation, survey data suggests overall support for the tobacco control policy after its introduction there Continue reading...

Lamb chop launched into space – video

A group of friends send a lamb chop into space using a a GoPro camera and a weather balloon to capture its journey from east London into space. The balloon burst soon after launch and the camera was lost until it was recovered by a farmer. Author Nikesh Shukla used the stunt to promote his upcoming novel Continue reading...


Crawler Group News | Awards & Certificates | Promote Us | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Uninstall Info

© 2014 Crawler Group. All rights reserved. Crawler Group is part of the Xacti Group Companies.
All other names are trademarks and/or registered trademarks of their respective owners.