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The Guardian (U.K.) 

'HIV global death estimates are wrong'

The researcher behind a recent Lancet study says we have overestimated Aids epidemic and underestimated malaria deaths Continue reading...

Mars rover's long-distance running hailed by Nasa

Solar-powered robot Opportunity beats Soviet record to go further than any other man-made vehicle on another world Continue reading...

Smashing Physics: how we discovered the Higgs boson - podcast

The British physicist Jon Butterworth discusses his new book Smashing Physics, an insider's account of the discovery of the Higgs boson. Plus, the origins of life Continue reading...

Does OKCupid need our consent?

We need a better quality debate about the algorithms that rule our online lives Continue reading...

Women, antibiotics and the Longitude Prize

Athene Donald: Times have changed since the first Longitude Prize and women now form an important part of the scientific workforce. Can the resultant diversity help to find creative solutions to this challenge prize? Continue reading...

The blatant sexism of lists about 'attractive girls'

It's not uncommon to see articles that refer to attractive people as a separate social group, or even a different sort of people altogether. The basis for doing so is often illogical and doesn't stand up to scrutiny Continue reading...

West African countries announce new measures to stop Ebola spread

Nigeria quarantines hospital and Liberia shuts borders but lack of resources and understanding fuels deadly outbreak Continue reading...

World's largest solar boat on odyssey to find ancient inhabited site in Greece

Scientists on catamaran PlanetSolar will search for village built by Neothlithic Europeans and also survey Aegean Sea Continue reading...

Open access: effective measures to put UK research online under threat?

The universities of the UK should not squander the opportunity to put in place an effective mechanism for making their published research freely available Continue reading...

Asteroid's 'bad timing' killed off dinosaurs, new evidence shows

Edinburgh University experts say asteroid hit Earth at a time when ecosystems had been weakened by a loss of biodiversity Continue reading...

Starwatch: The August night sky

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Archaeologist happens upon Roman bone fragments at the end of his road

Mike Heyworth says discovery in trench dug in York by utilities company demonstrates 'black holes' in archaeological planning Continue reading...

New to Nature No 128: Aetobatus narutobiei

A ray once considered a pest on the shores of Japan turns out to be two species with serious implications for future conservation Continue reading...

From photography to supercomputers: how we see ourselves in our inventions

Neuroscience encourages us to think of our brains as calculation machines, but such analogies, while useful, also demonstrate our limitations Continue reading...

Robo rehab

Robot-assisted rehabilitation is gaining traction in hospital stroke units, but exoskeleton-type devices may actually discourage patients from performing their exercises. Continue reading...

Science and war

Science and war have a complex relationship, mediated by technology and politics. Some thoughts on an excellent lecture by Jon Agar Continue reading...

Plantwatch: All in good time

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War of letters over call to abolish EC scientific adviser role

Research charities and scientific organisations fight environmental NGOs to preserve role of adviser to EC president Continue reading...

New Books Party: books received this week

Lots of fabulous books to tell you about this week! These fascinating new titles will certainly keep me busy reading for the next few weeks! Continue reading...

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes: an evolutionary perspective

Carole Jahme interviewed Planet of the Apes star Andy Serkis about talking apes, motion capture and extinction Continue reading...

Combining astrology and healthcare: your medical horoscopes

MP David Tredinnick has stated that he wants to see more astrology used in healthcare and medicine in the UK. Rather than dismiss or mock such an idea, perhaps it would be better to see how it might pan out. Continue reading...

Social media, science advisors and Siberian dinosaurs - blogs roundup

Posts on our network this week included a lookat the meaning of exponential, new techniques for detecting dementia, and a profile of the most famous navigator you've probably never heard of Continue reading...

Siberian dinosaur spreads feathers around the dinosaur tree

Newly discovered _Kulindadromeus_ opens up the possibility of many more dinosaurs having been coated in feather-like structures Continue reading...

Piggybacking cells hold clue to cancer growth and treatment for melanoma

Discovery of how fast growing tumour cells hitch ride on invasive cells could help create a new drug to tackle skin cancer Continue reading...

The owl who liked sitting on Caesar by Martin Windrow - review

A gentle and moving memoir by a man who shared his seventh-floor London flat with an unlikely companion; a tawny owl Continue reading...

Science advisers should be supported, not sacked

A coalition of environmental NGOs is calling for the post of Europe's chief scientist to be axed. Roger Pielke Jr explains why this is a misguided and shortsighted proposal Continue reading...

The Fightin Irish? Not when it comes to recession and austerity

Why has the Irish response to the financial crisis been so peaceful? Research in cultural psychology may provide some insights, argue Séamus A Power and David Nussbaum Continue reading...

Safety concerns remain over three-person IVF

Using mitochondrial replacement therapy to create embryos with DNA from three people could have serious consequences Read HFEA panel's response here Continue reading...

Great moments in science (if Twitter had existed)

Twitter is the source of a great deal of modern news, and scientists are often encouraged to tweet about their research. So what if Twitter had been around during the times of historic scientific breakthroughs and discoveries? Continue reading...

Flashy facilities arent enough to keep UK science healthy

The UK must invest in the triple-helix capacity of its universities: world-leading research, world-class education and training, and strong links with business and local economies, writes the Royal Society of Chemistry's Richard Walker Continue reading...


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