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The Guardian (U.K.) 

Coils and cables: Science Museum opens information age gallery

Museum unveils the UKs first permanent gallery dedicated to the history of information and communications technology Continue reading...

£200,000 smart drugs seizure prompts alarm over rising UK sales

Experimental medicine Sunifiram among record haul of drugs that are increasingly being bought online by students Continue reading...

Should the creation of novel viruses be banned? podcast

Do the benefits of creating enhanced viruses to study transmissibility and virulence outweigh the risks? Virologist Wendy Barclay and epidemiologist Marc Lipsitch debate this controversial question Continue reading...

Dead hearts transplanted into living patients in world first

Breakthrough by Australian surgeons at St Vincents hospital could save the lives of 30% more heart transplant patients Continue reading...

Information Age: 'The whole place lit up' 1950s telephone operator recalls the death of King George VI video

Rose Young tells Guardian science editor Ian Sample about her work as a telephone exchange operator during the 1950s, including the day the exchange lit up as news spread that King George VI had died. On Friday Queen Elizabeth II, his daughter, opened Information Age at London's Science Museum Continue reading...

Bears, okapis, crows and Wren - blogs roundup

Blogs on our network this week included a tribute to famed puzzler and mathematician Martin Gardner, a primer on quantum tunneling, and a look at the super world of super-resolution microscopy Continue reading...

Information Age: All you need is love (and three satellites)

In 1967, The Beatles and a BBC executive called Aubrey Singer managed to unite the world, albeit briefly, with the first global satellite broadcast _Information Age: Six Networks That Changed Our World at the Science Museum, London, opens on Saturday 25 October_ Continue reading...

Richard Dawkinss cosmic tombstone: what would you add?

Evolutionary biologist has called for a massive posthumous space-brag, giving future lifeforms the chance to understand us Continue reading...

Transforming innovation policy

With a new European Commission about to take office, and an updated UK strategy for science and innovation expected in the next few weeks, this is an important moment to debate the future of innovation policy. Continue reading...

Bears on stairs, Bez stares on: Manchester Science Festival

Two weeks of Creation, Experimentation and Wonder start in Manchester. And a new doctor too Continue reading...

Spacewatch: Countdown to Philaes comet landing

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Sinister truths of some everyday euphemisms

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Brain games exploit anxieties about memory loss for profit scientists

Open letter says claims made for brain games are not based on sound evidence and playing them may have the opposite effect Continue reading...

Plantwatch: Craze for foraging may endanger our mushrooms

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Martin Perl obituary

Physicist who won the Nobel prize for his discovery of the tau lepton Continue reading...

Information Age: Paul Robeson, McCarthy and the submarine repeater

In the 1950s, an amazing piece of kit carried the voice of the singer and civil rights activist Paul Robeson loud and clear across the Atlantic to London_Information Age: Six Networks That Changed Our World at the Science Museum, London, opens on Saturday 25 October_ Continue reading...

Rosetta mission: Philae comet probe could unlock secrets of the universe

Craft named after Egyptian obelisk will land on comet and collect samples that could give clues to origins of the galaxy Continue reading...

The okapis skull. But where is its body?

The okapi is one of the worlds most elusive mammals. In 1904, the British explorer Percy Powell-Cotton set his sights on obtaining a specimen for his growing natural history collection. He succeeded and its skull is on display. But where is the rest of it? Continue reading...

Ancient human bone helps date our first sex with Neanderthals

Oldest genome sequence of a modern human suggests _Homo sapiens_ first bred with Neanderthals 50,000-60,000 years ago Continue reading...

Bizarre dinosaur reconstructed after 50 years of wild speculation

_Deinocheirus mirificus_, or unusual horrible hand, had long, clawed forearms, a sail on its back and a duck-like bill Continue reading...

New books party: Books that arrived recently

Heres a few more books to help you become that modern polymath you want to become. Continue reading...

How super-resolution microscopy made me fall in love with science (again)

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then a super-resolution image may be worth a thousand gigabytes and its changing the course of biomedical research Continue reading...

Can you solve Martin Gardners best mathematical puzzles?

The maestro of recreational maths was born 100 years ago today. Here we celebrate his birthday with eight of his most celebrated puzzles Continue reading...

Google Doodle forgets to celebrate Christopher Wren the man of science

Todays Google Doodle marks the birthday of Christopher Wren, the architect, but we should also remember him as an astronomer and founding figure for the Royal Society and Royal Observatory Continue reading...

Caw vs. Kraa: meaning in the calls of crows and ravens

This short video, by the Cornell Lab of O, discusses the differences between and potential meanings of the sounds made by crows and ravens. Continue reading...

New books party: Books that arrived recently

After my bookgasm (book-buying binge) at last weeks Frankfurt Book Fair, Ive got a mountain of wonderful books to share with you -- a project that will take place over the next few weeks. Continue reading...

Consensus, chemical signals and colouring by letters - blogs roundup

Posts on our network this week included analysis of the state of UK science, a primer on social anxiety, and a look at the statistical adventures of Jean Golding Continue reading...

Brain baloney has no place in the classroom

A study published this week brilliantly debunks myths about the brain that pervade the education system Continue reading...

Nick and Teslas Super-Cyborg Gadget Glove - review

The newest instalment in the Nick and Tesla science mysteries series, where young people learn to use their scientific and electronics knowledge to solve mysteries around them. Continue reading...

UK science: look at the state we're in

Briefings published today by the Campaign for Science and Engineering highlight science policy issues that should be debated vigorously before next years election Continue reading...


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